Friday, May 22, 2020

Conjugation of the French Verb Convenir

The word suit can be a noun or a verb. In French, the verb is  convenir, meaning to suit or to be suitable. As a noun for an article of clothing, ​​there are a few ways to say suit and it depends on a number of factors.​ Conjugating the French Verb  Convenir French verb conjugations can be a headache for many students and  convenir  does not make it any easier. Thats because its an  irregular verb  and does not follow a common conjugation pattern. However, all French verbs ending in  -venir  and  -tenir  are conjugated this way. To form the proper conjugation, you will need to choose the correct subject pronoun and pair that with the appropriate tense for your sentence. For instance, using the verb stem  convien-, you can say I suit with je conviens and we will suit with nous conviendrons. Subject Present Future Imperfect je conviens conviendrai convenais tu conviens conviendras convenais il convient conviendra convenait nous convenons conviendrons convenions vous convenez conviendrez conveniez ils conviennent conviendront convenaient The Present Participle of  Convenir When you add -ant  to the stem of  convenir, the  present participle  convenant  is created. This is a verb or can be an adjective, gerund, or noun when necessary. The Past Participle and Passà © Composà © For the past tense suited,  you can use either the imperfect or the  passà © composà ©. To form the latter, conjugate the  auxiliary verb  Ãƒ ªtre  for the subject, then add the  past participle  convenu. For example, I suited is je suis convenu and we found suitable is nous sommes convenu. More Simple Convenir  Conjugations There will also be times when you will use or encounter one of the following conjugations. Both the subjunctive and conditional imply some degree of uncertainty. The passà © simple and imperfect subjunctive are found most often in formal writing. Subject Subjunctive Conditional Pass Simple Imperfect Subjunctive je convienne conviendrais convins convinsse tu conviennes conviendrais convins convinsses il convienne conviendrait convint convnt nous convenions conviendrions convnmes convinssions vous conveniez conviendriez convntes convinssiez ils conviennent conviendraient convinrent convinssent The imperative verb form of  convenir  is easy. When using it, the subject pronoun is not required. Rather than saying tu conviens, simplify it to conviens. Imperative (tu) conviens (nous) convenons (vous) convenez ​​

Friday, May 8, 2020

Differences Between Men and Women as Seen in Ibsens A...

At the end of Henrik Ibsens play, A Dolls House, Nora Helmer, the protagonist of the play, walks away from her husband and children and away from all of the social pressures that, as a woman, she has faced. The play seems to be entirely about the differences between men and women and Noras need to be seen as an equal yet her husbands need (and societys need) to keep her in a subservient position. It has been deemed a struggle of genders and Ibsen can arguably be seen as a fervent supporter of womens rights by giving Nora the courage to stand up for herself and for all women in their quest to be on equal ground as their male counterparts. Yet there is something in Noras behavior throughout the play and in her final exit that deserves some close examination. Nora is a victim of her sex, according to the play. Long before Torvald, her husband, ever came along, Nora was oppressed by her father. Noras father saw her as little more than a doll to be dressed up and kept for his amusement. I t is not then strange that Nora found a husband who did the exact same thing with her offering her pretty dresses and encouraging her to put on little shows for him. Nora was never instilled with the ability or the encouragement to speak her own mind or stand up for what she wanted. She was raised to believe that men spoke their minds and the women merely listened. The plays title, A Dolls House, is apt since Nora is kept inside this house where the men manipulate her into doing whatShow MoreRelatedA Doll s House By Henrik Ibsen1639 Words   |  7 PagesIn the play A Doll’s House, Henrik Ibsen examines the roles of a woman during the nineteenth century in a male dominated Victorian society. The play is a well-played out journey of the main character, Nora, self-discovery and struggles against the oppression of her husband Torvald and the society he represents. Nora, who is the wife of Torvald Helmer, is the heroine of the play in the end. At the beginning of Act I, the s cene is a clear picture of the lifestyle of the Helmer’s household. TheRead MoreThe Role Of Women In The Doll House And Trifles1667 Words   |  7 Pages Throughout history women have been handed a subservient role to her male counterpoint. Females in the late 19th and early 20th century were treated like a second-class citizen, and were thought of as being the weaker sex. It was the women’s job to stay home to cook and raise the children. While these are still prevalent issues, it is also true that things has gotten better for some women in recent years. Works like â€Å"The Doll House† by Henrik Ibsen and â€Å"Trifles† by Susan Glaspell have helped advanceRead MoreHenrik Ibsen s A Doll s House1403 Words   |  6 Pages1. In A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, there are three major references in the play that explain Ibsen’s thoughts on both gender and societal roles for when of the past and present; these three references are to dolls, to animals such as skylarks and squirrels, and to children. Nearing the end of the story, Nora reveals that she feels similarly towards Torvald as she did to her father: â€Å"But our home has been nothing but a playroom. I have been your doll wife, just as at home I was Papa’s doll child;Read MoreThings Fall Apart and A Dolls House on Gender Roles Essay1441 Words   |  6 Pageshad boundaries between each gender, men being above women due to their expectations. This stereotype has be widely accepted, causing an unfair and unequal treatment between genders. They limit individuals, not granting them to achieve and follow their dreams. Society has recognized the differences between the gap among people, whether it’s the way their characterized, or the way people appear, men are seen as the stronger ones, mentally, and physically, women, not so much. They are seen as more simpleRead MoreNora s Escape From Henrik Ibsen s A Doll s House Essay2552 Words   |  11 PagesHonor s Modern Literature 7 October 2016 Nora’s Escape Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House follows Nora’s struggles to escape the firm grasp of her domineering husband. Throughout the novel, Nora is depicted as obedient to her husband, Torvald, and never dares to stand up to him. Torvald’s condescension and thinly veiled misogyny continuously confines Nora to her strict 19th century gender role. The title of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House mirrors Nora’s sense of oppression and lack of agency as she strugglesRead MoreA Doll s House By Henrik Ibsen1089 Words   |  5 Pagesgender roles. The term gender role alludes to society s idea of how men and women are expected to act and behave. Gender roles are based on norms, or standards, created by society. In American society, â€Å"masculine roles have commonly been related with strength, aggression, and dominance, while feminine roles have traditionally been related with passivity, nurturing, and subordination† (sex roles/gender roles). I n â€Å"A Doll’s House,† written by Henrik Ibsen, the readers are shown a firsthand view atRead MoreA Doll s House By Henrik Ibsen1089 Words   |  5 Pagesgender roles. The term gender role alludes to society s idea of how men and women are expected to act and behave. Gender roles are based on norms, or standards, created by society. In American society, â€Å"masculine roles have commonly been related with strength, aggression, and dominance, while feminine roles have traditionally been related with passivity, nurturing, and subordination† (sex roles/gender roles). In â€Å"A Doll’s House,† written by Henrik Ibsen, the readers are shown a firsthand view atRead MoreMrs Alving in Ghosts by Ibsen1187 Words   |  5 Pages1881, ‘duty’ was seen as a powerful motivator in both religion and society. The abstract concept of duty was what constrained society into ‘acceptable’ boundaries, and people without a sense of duty were often shunned and rejected by their fellow citizens. Henrik Ibsen was well-known for his somewhat controversial plays. Just before writing Ghosts, â€Å"Ghosts† he wrote A Doll’s House about a young woman seeking to escape the bonds of duty. While the classic feminist story in A Doll’s House has a hint ofRead MoreHenrik Ibsen s A Doll s House1450 Words   |  6 PagesEnglish A: Literature: Works In Translation Essay 2015-2017 Torvald as a tool of Interpellation in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House Candidate Name: Alexandria Fatta Candidate Number: 2081 Teacher: Mrs. Rodriguez Course: Higher Level English A Literature School: Hillel Academy School Number: Examination Year: May 2017 Word count: 1534 The play A Doll’s House (Henrik Ibsen) is centered around the lives of the antagonist, Torvald Helmer and his wife Nora Helmer. Torvald is deemed as the antagonistRead MoreAnalysis Of Franz Kafka s The Metamorphosis, And Henrik Ibsen s A Doll s House1965 Words   |  8 Pagesone way and interact with others another. Although society has changed and is different in many places, there will always be a standard that is set for community members. These standards can range from expectations for women, as mothers and wives, as well as the assumption that men should be the breadwinners of their families. Literature often reflects many standards that were found at the time of publication through the authors’ expressions of their ideas. Several of these standards are placed on

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Island of the Sequined Love Nun Chapter 8~9 Free Essays

string(49) " gig in choppers is flying oil rigs in the Gulf\." 8 The Humiliation of the Pilot As a Passenger Once on the plane, Tucker unfolded the letter from the mysterious doctor and read it again. Dear Mr. Case: I have become aware of your recent difficulties and I believe I have a proposition that will be of great benefit to us both. We will write a custom essay sample on Island of the Sequined Love Nun Chapter 8~9 or any similar topic only for you Order Now My wife and I are missionaries on Alualu, a rather remote atoll at the north-western tip of the Micronesian crescent. Since we are out of the normal shipping lanes and we are the sole medical provider for the people of the island, we maintain our own aircraft for the transport of medical supplies. We have recently procured a Lear 45 for this purpose, but our former pilot has been called to the mainland on personal business for an indefinite time. In short, Mr. Case, given your experience flying small jets and our unique requirements, we feel that this would be a perfect opportunity for us both. We are not concerned with the status of your license, only that you can perform in the pilot’s seat and fulfill a need that can only be described as dire. If you are willing to honor a long-term contract, we will provide you with room and board on the island, pay you $2,000 a week, as well as a generous bonus upon completion of the contract. As a gesture of our sincerity, I am enclosing an open airline ticket and a cashier’s check for $3,000 for traveling expenses. Contact us by e-mail with your arrival time in Truk and my wife will meet you there to discuss the conditions of your employment and pro vide transportation to Alualu. You’ll find a room reserved for you at the Paradise Inn. Sincerely, Sebastian Curtis, M.D. [email protected] Why me? Tuck wondered. He’d crashed a jet, lost his job and probably his sex life, was charged with multiple crimes, then a letter and a check arrived from nowhere to bail him out, but only if he was willing to abandon everything and move to a Pacific island. It could turn out to be a good job, but if it had been his decision, he’d still be lingering over it in a motel room with Dusty Lemon. It was as if some combination of ironic luck and Jake Skye had been sent along to make the decision for him. Not so strange, he thought. The same combination had put him in the pilot’s seat in the first place. Tuck had grown up in Elsinore, California, northeast of San Diego, the only son of the owner of the Denmark Silverware Corporation. He had an unremarkable childhood, was a mediocre athlete, and spent most of his adolescence surfing in San Diego and chasing girls, one of whom he finally caught. Zoophilia Gold was the daughter of his father’s lawyer, a lovely girl made shy by a cruel first name. Tuck and Zoo enjoyed a brief romance, which was put on hold when Tuck’s father sent him off to college in Texas so he could learn to make decisions and someday take over the family business. His motivation excised by the job guarantee, Tuck made passing grades until his college career was cut short by an emergency call from his mother. â€Å"Come home. Your father’s dead.† Tuck made the drive in two days, stopping only for gas, to use the bathroom, and to call Zoophilia, who informed him that his mother had married his father’s brother and his uncle had taken over Denmark Silver-ware. Tuck screeched into Elsinore in a blind rage and ran over Zoophilia’s father as he was leaving Tuck’s mother’s house. The death was declared an accident, but during the investigation a policeman informed Tuck that although he had no proof, he suspected that the riding accident that killed Tuck’s father might not have been an accident, especially since Tuck’s father had been allergic to horses. Tuck was sure that his uncle had set the whole thing up, but he couldn’t bring himself to confront his mother or her new husband. In the meantime, Zoophilia, stricken with grief over her father’s death, overdosed on Prozac and drowned in her hot tub, and her brother, who had been away at college also, returned promising to kill Tucker or at least sue him into oblivion for the deaths of his father and sister. While trying to come to a decision on a course of action, Tucker met a brace of Texas brunettes in a Pacific Beach bar who insisted he ride back with them to the Lone Star state. Disinherited, depressed, and clueless, Tucker took the ride as far as a small suburban airport outside of Houston, where the girls asked him if he’d ever been nude skydiving. At that point, not really caring if he lived or died, he crawled into the back of a Beechcraft with them. They left him scraped, bruised, and stranded on the tarmac in a jockstrap and a parachute harness, shivering with adrenaline. Jake Skye found him wandering around the hangars wearing the parachute canopy as a toga. It had been a tough year. â€Å"Let me guess,† Jake said. â€Å"Margie and Randy Sue?† â€Å"Yeah,† Tucker said. â€Å"How’d you know?† â€Å"They do it all the time. Daddies with money – Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Petroleum. Hope you didn’t cut up that canopy. You can get a grand for it used.† â€Å"They’re gone, then?† â€Å"An hour ago. Said something about going to London. Where are your clothes?† â€Å"In their car.† â€Å"Come with me.† Jake gave Tucker a job washing airplanes, then taught him to fly a Cessna 172 and enrolled him in flight school. Tucker got his twin-engine hours in six months, helping Jake ferry Texas businessmen around the state in a leased Beech Duke. Jake turned the flying over to Tuck as soon as he passed his 135 commercial certification. â€Å"I can fly anything,† Jake said, â€Å"but unless it’s helicopters, I’d rather wrench. Only steady gig in choppers is flying oil rigs in the Gulf. You read "Island of the Sequined Love Nun Chapter 8~9" in category "Essay examples" Had too many friends tip off into the drink. You fly, I’ll do the maintenance, we split the cash.† Another six months and Jake was offered a job by the Mary Jean Cosmetics Corporation. Jake took the job on the condition that Tucker could copilot until he had his Lear hours (he described Tuck as a â€Å"little lost lamb† and the makeup magnate relented). Mary Jean did her own flying, but once Tucker was qualified, she turned the controls over to him full-time. â€Å"Some members of the board have pointed out that my time would be better spent taking care of business instead of flying. Besides, it’s not ladylike. How’d you like a job?† Luck. The training he’d received would have cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, and he’d gotten most of it for free. He had become a new person, and it had all started with a bizarre streak of bad luck followed by an op-portunity and Jake Skye’s intervention. Maybe it would work out for the better this time too. At least this time no one had been killed. 9 Cult of the Autopilot: A History Lesson The pilot said, â€Å"The local time is 9:00 A.M. The temperature is 90 degrees. Thank you for flying Continental and enjoy your stay in Truk.† Then he laughed menacingly. Tuck stepped out of the plane and felt the palpable weight of the air in his lungs. It smelled green, fecund, as if vegetation was growing, dying, rotting, and giving off a gas too thick to breathe. He followed a line of passengers to the terminal, a long, low, cinderblock building – nothing more really than a tin roof on pillars – teeming with brown people; short, stoutly built people, men in jeans or old dress slacks and T-shirts, women in long floral cotton dresses with puff shoulders, their hair held in buns atop their heads by tortoiseshell combs. Tuck waited, sweating, at one end of the terminal while young men shoved the baggage through a curtain onto a plywood ramp. Natives re-trieved their baggage, mainly coolers wrapped with packing tape, and walked by the customs officer’s counter without pausing. He looked for a tourist, to see how they were treated, but there were none. The customs officer glared at him. Tucker hoped there was nothing illegal in his pack. The airport here looked like a weigh station for a death camp; he didn’t want to see the jail. He fingered the roll of bills in his pocket, thinking, Bribe. The pack came sliding through the curtain. Tucker moved through the pall of islanders and pulled the pack onto his shoulders, then walked to the customs counter and plopped it down in front of the officer. â€Å"Passport,† the officer said. He was fat and wore a brass button uniform with dime store flip-flops on his feet. Tuck handed him his passport. â€Å"How long will you be staying?† â€Å"Not long. I’m not sure. A day maybe.† â€Å"No flights for three days.† The officer stamped the passport and handed it back to Tucker. â€Å"There’s a ten-dollar departure fee.† â€Å"That’s it?† Tucker was amazed. No inspection, no bribe. Luck again. â€Å"Take your bag.† â€Å"Right.† Tucker scooped up the pack and headed for an exit sign, hand-painted on plywood. He walked out of the airport and was blinded by the sun. â€Å"Hey, you dive?† A man’s voice. Tuck squinted and a thin, leathery islander in a Bruins hockey jersey stood in front of him. He had six teeth, two of them gold. â€Å"No,† Tucker said. â€Å"Why you come if you no dive?† â€Å"I’m here on business.† Tucker dropped his pack and tried to breathe. He was soaked with sweat. Ten seconds in this sun and he wanted to dive into the shade like a roach under a stove. â€Å"Where you stay?† This guy looked criminal, just an eye patch short of a pirate. Tucker didn’t want to tell him anything. â€Å"How do I get to the Paradise Inn?† The pirate called to a teenager who was sitting in the shade watching a score of beat-up Japanese cars with blackened windows jockeying for position in the dirt street. â€Å"Rindi! Paradise.† The younger man, dressed like a Compton rapper – oversized shorts, football jersey, baseball cap reversed over a blue bandanna – came over and grabbed Tucker’s pack. Tuck kept one hand on an arm strap and fought the kid for control. â€Å"You go with him,† the pirate said. â€Å"He take you Paradise.† â€Å"Come on, Holmes,† the kid said. â€Å"My car air-conditioned. Tucker let go of the pack and the kid whisked it away through the jostle of cars to an old Honda Civic with a cellophane back window and bailing wire holding the passenger door shut. Tuck follow him, stepping quickly between the cars, each one lurching forward as if to hit him as he passed. He looked for the driver’s expressions, but the windshields were all blacked out with plastic film. The kid threw Tuck’s pack in the hatchback, then unwired the door and held it open. Tucker climbed in, feeling, once again, com pletely at the mercy of Lady Luck. Now I get to see the place where they rob and kill the white guys, he thought. As they drove, Tuck looked out on the lagoon. Even through the tinted window the blue of the lagoon shone as if illuminated from below. Island women in scuba masks waded shoulder deep; their floral dresses flowing around them made them look like multicolored jellyfish. Each carried a short steel spear slung from a piece of surgical tubing. Large plastic buckets floated on the surface in which the women were depositing their catch. â€Å"What are they hunting?† Tuck asked the driver. â€Å"Octopus, urchin, small fish. Mostly octopus. Hey, where you from in United States?† â€Å"I grew up in California.† The kid lit up. â€Å"California! You have Crips there, right?† â€Å"Yeah, there’s gangs.† â€Å"I’m a Crip,† the kid said, pointing to his blue bandanna with pride. â€Å"Me and my homies find any Bloods here, we gonna pop a nine on ’em.† Tucker was amazed. On the side of the road a beautiful little girl in a flowered dress was drinking from a green coconut. Here in the car there was a gang war going on. He said, â€Å"Where are the Bloods?† Rindi shook his head sadly. â€Å"Nobody want to be Bloods. Only Crips on Truk. But if we see one, we gonna bust a cap on ’em.† He pulled back a towel on the seat to reveal a beat-up Daisy air pistol. Tuck made a mental note not to wear a red bandanna and accidentally fill the Blood shortage. He had no desire to be killed or wounded over a glorified game of cowboys and Indians. â€Å"How far to the hotel?† â€Å"This it,† Rindi said, wrenching the Honda across the road into a dusty parking lot. The Paradise Inn was a two-story, crumbling stucco building with a crown of rusting rebar beckoning skyward for a third floor that would never be built. Tuck let the boy, Rindi, carry his pack to an upstairs room: mint green cinder block over brown linoleum, a beat-up metal desk, smoke-stained floral curtains, a twin bed with a torn 1950s bedspread, the smell of mildew and insecticide. Rindi put the pack in the doorless closet and cranked the little window air conditioner to high. â€Å"Too late for shower. Water come on again four to six.† Tuck glanced into the bathroom. Mistake. An exotic-looking or ange thing was growing on the shower curtain. He said, â€Å"Where can I get a beer?† Rindi grinned. â€Å"We have lounge. Budweiser, ‘king of beers.’ MTV on satellite.† He cocked his wrists and performed a gangsta rap move that looked as if he’d contracted a rhythmic cerebral palsy. â€Å"Yo, G, we chill with the phattest jams? Snoop, Ice, Public Enemy.† â€Å"Oh, good,† Tuck said. â€Å"We can do a drive-by later. How do I get to the lounge?† â€Å"Down steps, outside, go right.† He paused, looking concerned. â€Å"We have to shoot out driver’s side. Other window not go down.† â€Å"We’ll manage.† Tuck flipped the kid a dollar and left the room, proud to be an American. An unconscious island man marked the entrance to the lounge. Tuck stepped over him and pushed his way through the black glass door into a cool, dark, smoke-hazed room lit by a silent television tuned to nothing and a flickering neon BUDWEISER sign. A shadow stood behind the bar; two more sat in front of it. Tuck could see eyes in the dark – maybe people sitting at tables, maybe nocturnal vermin. A voice: â€Å"A fellow American here to buy a beer for his countryman.† The voice had come from one of the shadows at the bar. Tuck squinted into the dark and saw a large white man, about fifty, in a sweat-stained dress shirt. He was smiling, a jowly yellow smile under drink-dulled eyes. Tuck smiled back. Anyone that didn’t speak broken English was, at this point, his friend. â€Å"What are you drinkin’, pardner?† Tuck always went Texan when he was being friendly. â€Å"What you drink here.† He held up two fingers to the bartender, then held his hand out to shake. â€Å"Jefferson Pardee, editor in chief of the Truk Star.† â€Å"Tucker Case.† Tuck sat down on the stool next to the big man. The bartender placed two sweating Budweiser cans in front of them and waited. â€Å"Run a tab,† Pardee said. Then to Tuck: â€Å"I assume you’re a diver?† â€Å"Why would you assume that?† â€Å"It’s the only reason Americans come here, other than Peace Corps or Navy CAT team members. And if you don’t mind my saying, you don’t look idealistic enough to be Peace Corps or stupid enough to be Navy.† â€Å"I’m a pilot.† It felt good saying it. He’d always liked saying it. He didn’t realize how terrified he’d been that he’d never be able to say it again. â€Å"I’m supposed to meet someone from another island about a job.† â€Å"Not a missionary air outfit, I hope.† â€Å"It’s for a missionary doctor. Why?† â€Å"Son, those people do a great job, but you can only get so much out of those old planes they fly. Fifty-year-old Beech 18s and DC3s. Sooner or later you’re going into the drink. But I suppose if you’re flying for God†¦Ã¢â‚¬  â€Å"I’ll be flying a new Learjet.† Pardee almost dropped his beer. â€Å"Bullshit.† Tuck was tempted to pull out the letter and slam it on the bar, but thought better of it. â€Å"That’s what they said.† Pardee put a big hairy forearm on the bar and leaned into Tuck. He smelled like a hangover. â€Å"What island and what church?† â€Å"Alualu,† Tuck said. â€Å"A Dr. Curtis.† Pardee nodded and sat back on his stool. â€Å"No-man’s Island.† â€Å"What’s that mean?† â€Å"It doesn’t belong to anyone. Do you know anything about Micronesia?† â€Å"Just that you have gangs but no regular indoor plumbing.† â€Å"Well, depending on how you look at it, Truk can be a hellhole. That’s what happens when you give Coke cans to a coconut culture. But it’s not all that way. There are two thousand islands in the Micronesian crescent, running almost all the way from Hawaii to New Guinea. Magellan landed here first, on his first voyage around the world. The Spanish claimed them, then the Germans, then the Japanese. We took them from the Japanese during the war. There are seventy sunken Japanese ships in Truk’s lagoon alone. That’s why the divers come.† â€Å"So what’s this have to do with where I’m going?† â€Å"I’m getting to that. Until fifteen years ago, Micronesia was a U.S. protectorate, except for Alualu. Because it’s at the westernmost tip of the crescent, we left it out of the surrender agreement with the Japanese. It kind of got lost in the shuffle. So Alualu was never an American territory, and when the Federated States of Micronesia declared independence, they didn’t include Alualu.† â€Å"So what’s that mean?† Tuck was getting impatient. This was the longest lecture he’d endured since flight school. â€Å"In short, no mother government, no foreign aid, no nothing. Alualu belongs to whoever lives on it. It’s off the shipping lanes, and it’s a raised atoll, only one small island, not a group of islands around a lagoon, so there’s not enough copra to make it worth the trip for the collector boats. Since the war, when there was an airstrip there, no one goes there.† â€Å"Maybe that’s why they need the jet?† â€Å"Son, I came here in ’66 with the Peace Corps and I’ve never left. I’ve seen a lot of missionaries throw a lot of money at a lot of problems, but I’ve never seen a church that was willing to spring for a Learjet.† Tuck wanted to beat his head on the bar just to feel his tiny brain rattle. Of course it was too good to be true. He’d known that instinctively. He should have known that as soon as he’d seen the money they were offering him – him, Tucker Case, the biggest fuckup in the world. Tuck drained his beer and signaled for two more. â€Å"So what do you know about this Curtis?† â€Å"I’ve heard of him. There’s not much news out here and he made some about twenty years back. He went batshit at the airport in Yap after he couldn’t get anyone to evacuate a sick kid off the island. Frankly, I’m sur-prised he’s still out there. I heard the church pulled out on him. Cargo cults give Christians the willies.† Tuck knew he was being lured in. He’d met guys like Pardee in airport hotel bars all over the U.S.: lonely businessmen, usually salesmen, who would talk to anyone about anything just for the company. They learned how to make you ask questions that required long windy answers. He’d felt sympathetic toward them ever since he’d played Willie Loman in Miss Patterson’s third-grade class production of Death of a Salesman. Pardee just needed to talk. â€Å"What’s a cargo cult?† Tuck asked. Pardee smiled. â€Å"They’ve been in the islands since the Spanish landed in the 1500s and traded steel tools and beads to the natives for food and water. They’re still around.† Pardee took a long pull on his beer, set it down, and resumed. â€Å"These islands were all populated by people from somewhere else. The stories of the heroic ancestors coming across the sea in canoes are part of their reli-gions. The ancestors brought everything they need from across the sea. All of a sudden, guys show up with new cool stuff. Instant ancestors, instant gods from across the sea, bearing gifts. They incorporated the newcomers into their religions. Sometimes it might be fifty years before another ship showed up, but every time they used a machete, they thought about the return of the gods bearing cargo.† â€Å"So there are still people waiting for the Spanish to return with steel tools.† Pardee laughed. â€Å"No. Except for missionaries, these islands didn’t get much attention from the modern world until World War II. All of a sudden, Allied forces are coming in and building airstrips and bribing the islanders with things so they would resist the Japanese. Manna from the heavens. American flyers brought in all sorts of good stuff. Then the war ended and the good stuff stopped coming. â€Å"Years later anthropologists and missionaries are finding little altars built to airplanes. The islanders are still waiting for the ships from the sky to return and save them. Myths get built around single pilots who are supposed to bring great armies to the islands to chase out the French, or the British, or whatever imperial government holds the island. The British outlawed the cargo cults on some Melanesian islands and jailed the leaders. Bad idea, of course. They were instant martyrs. The missionaries railed against the new religions, trying to use reason to kill faith, so some islanders started claiming their pilots were Jesus. Drove the missionaries nuts. Natives putting little propellers on their crucifixes, drawing pictures of Christ in a flight helmet. Bottom line is the cargo cults are still around, and I hear that one of the strongest is on Alualu.† â€Å"Are the natives dangerous?† Tuck asked. â€Å"Not because of their religion, no.† â€Å"What’s that mean?† â€Å"These people are warriors, Mr. Case. They forget that most of the time, but sometimes when they’re drinking, a thousand years of warrior tradition can rear its head, even on the more modernized islands like Truk. And there are people in these islands who still remember the taste of human flesh – if you get my meaning. Tastes like Spam, I hear. The natives love Spam.† â€Å"Spam? You’re kidding.† â€Å"Nope. That’s what Spam stands for: Shaped Protein Approximating Man.† Tucker smiled, realizing he’d been had. Pardee let loose an explosive laugh and slapped Tuck on the shoulder. â€Å"Look, my friend, I’ve got to get to the office. A paper to put out, you know. But watch yourself. And don’t be surprised if your Learjet is actually a beat-up Cessna.† â€Å"Thanks,† Tucker said, shaking the big man’s hand. â€Å"You going to be around for few days?† Pardee asked. â€Å"I’m not sure.† â€Å"Well, just a word of advice† – Pardee lowered his voice and leaned into Tucker conspiratorially – â€Å"don’t go out at night by yourself. Nothing you’re going to see is worth your life.† â€Å"I can take care of myself, but thanks.† â€Å"Just so,† Pardee said. He turned and lumbered out of the bar. Tuck paid the bartender and headed out into the heat and to his room, where he stripped naked and lay on the tattered bedspread, letting the air conditioner blow over him with a welcome chill. Maybe this won’t be so bad, he thought. He was going to end up on an island where God was a pilot. What a great way to get babes! Then he looked down at his withered member, stitched and scarred as if it had been patched from the Frankenstein monster. A wave of anxiety passed through him, bringing sweat to his skin even in the electric chill. He realized that he had really never done anything in his adult life that had not – even at some subconscious level – been part of a strategy to im-press women. He would have never worked so hard to become a pilot if it hadn’t been for Jake’s insistence that â€Å"Chicks dig pilots.† Why fly? Why get out of bed in the morning? Why do anything? He rolled over to bury his face in the pillow and pinned a live cockroach to the spread with his cheek. How to cite Island of the Sequined Love Nun Chapter 8~9, Essay examples

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Wendell Phillips Essay Example For Students

Wendell Phillips Essay Wendell Phillips was born on November 29, 1811. He was a well-knownAmerican reformer. His career of attempting to reform American society spanned47 years. He put most of his energy into opposing slavery and supportingwomens rights, labor reform, and temperance. In 1865 he attacked theConstitution. He attacked it because it supported slavery. He had married Ann Terry Greene. Greene had been taught by William LloydGarrison. Garrison and Phillips became friends. As the Civil War approached he became more and more certain thatviolence must be employed to abolish slavery. When the war came he was at thehead of the emancipation movement. We will write a custom essay on Wendell Phillips specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now In the years after the war Wendell Phillips demanded that actions betaken to protect blacks and loyal whites in the South.He also becamemore involved in workers rights. His speeches and lectures soon becamepublished. On February 2, 1884 Wendell Phillips died. In conclusion I believe that a soldier would be a good symbol forWendell Phillips. It would be a good symbol because soldiers fight hard for whatthey believe in. This is what Wendell Phillips did. Category: Biographies

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Free Essays on Anti- Federalists

The formation of our Constitution was a difficult task for our founding fathers. The goal was to establish a new working government to rule an American Nation. This new government would be in the benefit of the citizens as well as the individual person. Just as all great ideals come with great intentions the outcome may not be of the desired result. With the population larger than many other countries to begin with and giving them the opportunity to form their own Constitution to be rule by would be more than enough to separate any social gathering. Beginning of the Anti-Federalist The Federalist and the Anti-Federalist are considered to be some of the first political parties of this country. Despite the name of these two parties their views are actually in opposite of there titles. The Federalist group was those in favor of the Constitution and advertised it to the people to ratify it. Those who disagreed or wished to make changes with the newly Constitution, they were accused of have dramatic apposing views to the Federalist parties. However â€Å"The truly federalist-minded group was a bit slow on the public-relations uptake and promptly found themselves saddled with the label ‘Anti-Federalist’, with all the negativity and obstructionism the name implied.† (Inerny 67) The Anti-Feudalists felt that the Articles of Confederation need some revising in the distribution of power. It was their opinion that the Constitution gave to much freedom to the president, not enough power to the local government, and the congress would be to small to properly and productively serve their constituencies. Anti-Federalists feared that with the dominant power in the national government the central government would decay to nothing, leaving the national government unaware of local activities. This would cause the government to run the country by force, creating a new form of Tyranny. The Anti-Feudalists believed that the solutio... Free Essays on Anti- Federalists Free Essays on Anti- Federalists The formation of our Constitution was a difficult task for our founding fathers. The goal was to establish a new working government to rule an American Nation. This new government would be in the benefit of the citizens as well as the individual person. Just as all great ideals come with great intentions the outcome may not be of the desired result. With the population larger than many other countries to begin with and giving them the opportunity to form their own Constitution to be rule by would be more than enough to separate any social gathering. Beginning of the Anti-Federalist The Federalist and the Anti-Federalist are considered to be some of the first political parties of this country. Despite the name of these two parties their views are actually in opposite of there titles. The Federalist group was those in favor of the Constitution and advertised it to the people to ratify it. Those who disagreed or wished to make changes with the newly Constitution, they were accused of have dramatic apposing views to the Federalist parties. However â€Å"The truly federalist-minded group was a bit slow on the public-relations uptake and promptly found themselves saddled with the label ‘Anti-Federalist’, with all the negativity and obstructionism the name implied.† (Inerny 67) The Anti-Feudalists felt that the Articles of Confederation need some revising in the distribution of power. It was their opinion that the Constitution gave to much freedom to the president, not enough power to the local government, and the congress would be to small to properly and productively serve their constituencies. Anti-Federalists feared that with the dominant power in the national government the central government would decay to nothing, leaving the national government unaware of local activities. This would cause the government to run the country by force, creating a new form of Tyranny. The Anti-Feudalists believed that the solutio...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Organic Compound Names and Formulas (A)

Organic Compound Names and Formulas (A) This is a list of organic compound names and formulas with names starting with the letter A. Abietane - C20H36Abietic acid - C20H30O2Acenaphthene - C12H10Acenaphthoquinone - C12H6O2Acenaphthylene - C12H8Acepromazine - C19H22N2OSAcetal (1,1-diethoxyethane) - C6H14O2Acetaldehyde - C2H4OAcetaldehyde Ammonia Trimer - C6H15N3Acetamide - C2H5NOAcetaminophen - C8H9NO2Acetaminophen (ball and stick model) - C8H9NO2Acetaminosalol - C15H13NO4Acetamiprid - C10H11ClN4Acetanilide - C6H5NH(COCH3)Acetic acid - CH3COOHAcetoguanamine - C4H7N5Acetone - CH3COCH3, or (CH3)2COAcetone (space filling model) - CH3COCH3, or (CH3)2COAcetonitrile - C2H3NAcetophenone - C8H8Oacetyl chloride - C2H3ClOAcetylcholine – (CH3)3NCH2CH2OCOCH3.Acetylene - C2H2N-Acetylglutamate - C7H11NO5Acetylsalicylic Acid - C9H8O4 (also known as Aspirin)Acid fuchsin - C20H17N3Na2O9S3Acridine - C13H9NAcridine orange - C17H19N3Acrolein - C3H4OAcrylamide - C3H5NOAcrylic acid - C3H4O2Acrylonitrile - C3H3NAcryloyl chloride - C3H3ClOAcyclovir - C8H11N5O3Adamantane - C10H16Adenosine - C10H13N5O4Adipamide - C6H12N2O2Adipic acid - C6H10O4Adiponitrile - C6H8N2Adipoyl dichloride - C6H8Cl2O2Adonitol - C5H12O5Adrenochrome - C9H9NO3Epinephrine (adrenaline) - C9H13NO3AflatoxinAIBN (2-2-azobisisobutyronitrile)Alanine - C3H7NO2D-Alanine - C3H7NO2L-Alanine - C3H7NO2AlbuminsAlcian blue - C56H58Cl14CuN16S4Aldosterone - C21H28O5Aldrin - C12H8Cl6Aliquat 336 - C25H54ClNAlizarin - C14H8O4Allantoic acid - C4H8N4O4Allantoin - C4H6N4O3Allegra - C32H39NO4AllethrinAllyl propyl disulfide - C6H12S2Allylamine - C3H7NAllyl chloride - C3H5ClAmide general structureAmido black 10b - C22H14N6Na2O9S2p-Aminobenzoic acid (PABA) - C7H7NO2Aminoethylpiperazine - C6H15N35-Amino-2-hydroxybenzoic acid - C7H7NO3Aminophylline - C16H24N10O45-Aminosalicylic acid - C7H7NO3Aminothiazole - C3H4N2SAmiodarone - C25H29I2NO3Amiton - C10H24NO3PSAmobarbital - C11H18N2O3Amoxicillin - C16H19N3O5S.3H2OAmphetamine - C9H13NAmyl nitrate - C5H11NO3Amyl nitrite - C5H11NO2Anandamide - C22H37NO2Anethole - C10H12OAngelic acid - C5H8O2Anilazine - C9H5Cl3N4Anil ine - C6H5 -NH2 /C6H7NAniline hydrochloride - C6H8ClNAnisaldehyde - C8H8O2Anisole - C6H5OCH2Anisoyl chloride - C8H7ClO2Anthanthrene - C22H12anthracene – (C6H4CH)2Anthramine - C14H11NAnthranilic acid - C7H7NO2Anthraquinone - C14H8O2Anthrone - C14H10OAntipyrine - C11H12N2OAprotinin - C284H432N84O79S7Arabinose - C5O10H5Arginine - C6H14N4O2D-Arginine - C6H14N4O2L-Arginine - C6H14N4O2Aroclor (polychlorinated biphenyls) - C12H10-xClx, where x 1Arsole - C4H5AsAscorbic acid (vitamin C) - C6H8O6Asparagine - C4H8N2O3D-Asparagine - C4H8N2O3L-Asparagine - C4H8N2O3Asparagusic acid - C4H6O2S2Aspartame - C14H18N2O5Aspartic acid - C4H7NO4D-Aspartic acid - C4H7NO4L-Aspartic acid - C4H7NO4Aspidofractinine - C19H24N2Asphidophytidine - C17H22ClN3Aspidospermidine - C19H26N2Astra blue - C47H52CuN14O6S3Atrazine - C8H14ClN5Auramine O - C8H14ClN5Aureine - C18H25NO5Aurin - C19H14O3Avobenzone - C20H22O3Azadirachtin - C35H44O16Azathioprine - C9H7N7O2SAzelaic acid - C9H16O4Azepane - C6H13NAzinphos-met hyl - C10H12N3O3PS2Aziridine - C2H5NAzithromycin - C38H72N2O122-2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN)Azo violet - C12H9N3O4Azobenzene - C12H10N2Azulene - C10H8Azure A - C14H14ClN3S

Sunday, February 16, 2020

Zoo Activity. Monkey Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Zoo Activity. Monkey - Essay Example However, this does not necessarily mean that human beings and apes such as monkeys belong to one single species. The truth, as has been revealed by several researchers, is that these organisms are related. They must be having something common in their DNA which proves that they were initially belonging into the same species. However, as time went by, several changes occurred in the environment which necessitated the development of more species from the already existing ones. For instance, as a result of the plate tectonics, several regions of the world were separated a part. As a result, the continents separated by large masses of water emerged. This lead to the separation of organisms which were initially living together. It explains why there is a morphological difference between the Homo sapiens and monkeys. Had there been no such separations, the human beings would not have developed more advanced features which were later relied on to distinguish them from apes. When organisms which were once enjoying similar lifestyle were separated, the connection between them was permanently cut off. Therefore, going into new environments meant that they had to look for ways through which they would survive.